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LIDIA WANDA BOBR, F. X. OGASAWARA and F. W. LORENZ

Summary.

The distribution of spermatozoa in the oviducts of domestic hens, at various times after artificial insemination or copulation, confirmed and extended previous observations regarding the speed with which spermatozoa may traverse the uterovaginal junction and ascend the oviduct. These spermatozoa disappear within less than 24 hr. Thereafter, spermatozoa are ordinarily found only in the uterovaginal glands except about the time of oviposition or ovulation. They presumably reenter the oviduct lumen, under the influence of oviposition or ovulation. Spermatozoa were found in considerable numbers on the vitelline membranes of eggs and occasionally in egg albumen.

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F. X. OGASAWARA, F. W. LORENZ and LIDIA WANDA BOBR

Summary.

Semen from low-fecundity cocks, characterized by relatively large numbers of spermatozoa with abnormal morphology, poor motility and sluggish metabolism, fertilized very few eggs when inseminated mid-vaginally, but produced moderate fertility when deposited in the uterus.

The percentage of pre-ovipositally dead embryos was also increased in eggs fertilized by spermatozoa from low-fecundity cocks when these were deposited directly in the uterus.

Few spermatozoa from low-fecundity cocks entered and/or survived in oviducal glands, especially in those of the uterovaginal junction.

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LIDIA WANDA BOBR, F. W. LORENZ and F. X. OGASAWARA

Summary.

A glandular region is described in the uterovaginal junction of the domestic fowl; the glands are residence sites for spermatozoa, which invade them rapidly and in large numbers after copulation or artificial insemination. Accumulations of spermatozoa are found in these glands, though in decreasing numbers, for as long as fertilized eggs are produced. The accumulations are similar in appearance to those previously described in infundibular glands, but spermatozoa can be made to penetrate the latter in considerable numbers only with special and unusual techniques. Consequently, it is suggested that the uterovaginal glands, not the infundibular glands, are the normal residence sites for those spermatozoa that are responsible for the continued fertilization of eggs after artificial insemination or when the hen is separated from the male.