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SALLY R. De FAZIO and M. M. KETCHEL

Summary.

Rabbit antibody to human cervical mucus was used in the immuno-electrophoretic analysis of cervical mucus, seminal plasma and blood serum. Eleven antigens were found in cervical mucus, but no more than nine in any one sample. One post-coital sample of cervical mucus in the pool used to produce the antiserum contained an antigen, thought to be prostatic acid phosphatase, derived from the semen contamination. Three antigens appeared specific for cervical mucus, being absent from seminal plasma and serum. Another two antigens were shared with seminal plasma and serum, two were shared with seminal plasma only, and a further two were shared with serum only.

Two of the cervical mucus antigens were identified as immuno-globulin-G and albumin, and another two were believed to be transferrin and α-1 antitrypsin.

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SALLY R. DE FAZIO and M. M. KETCHEL

Summary.

Extracts of tissues and secretions of women were examined by immunoelectrophoresis with an antiserum against human seminal plasma. Of the twenty-three detected seminal plasma antigens, seven were found in blood serum, and ten antigens not detected in blood serum were found in other female tissues and secretions. Milk was found to contain one non-serum seminal plasma antigen; saliva, urine, vagina and ovary each contained two; cervical mucus and kidney each contained three; nasal secretion, cervix, endometrium, and Fallopian tubes each contained four; and gastric fluid contained five such antigens. It is suggested that women may avoid adverse immunological reactions to seminal plasma because its antigens are not foreign to them.