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ANNABELLE DARIN-BENNETT, A. POULOS and I. G. WHITE

Lardy & Phillips (1941a,b) postulated that the endogenous phospholipids are used as a source of oxidizable energy by bull spermatozoa in the absence of sugar. Their results were not confirmed by the later work of Bomstein & Steberl (1957) with bull spermatozoa, or by Poulos & White (1973) with human spermatozoa. Hartree & Mann (1959, 1961) examined the effect of aerobic and anaerobic incubation of washed ram spermatozoa on the utilization of endogenous phospholipids and their results, though different from those of Lardy & Phillips (1941a,b), supported the latter's original hypothesis. Scott & Dawson (1968) briefly examined the effect of incubation on the phospholipids of washed ram spermatozoa and did not detect the same degree of plasmalogen loss as did Hartree & Mann (1961). The latter authors also found that incubation resulted in the release

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Annabelle Darin-Bennett, I. G. White and D. D. Hoskins

Summary. The major components of the phospholipids of rhesus monkey spermatozoa are phosphatidyl choline (33%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (25%), ethanolamine plasmalogen (16·1%), sphingomyelin (8·1%), choline plasmalogen (6·9%) and cardiolipin (4·5%). The major phospholiped-bound fatty acids are 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 22:6; the major fatty aldehydes are 15:0, 16:0 and 18:2. The same phospholipids are also present in the seminal plasma.

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ANNABELLE DARIN-BENNETT, A. POULOS and I. G. WHITE

Department of Veterinary Physiology, University of Sydney, N.S. W. 2006, Australia

(Received 3rd May 1974)

Recent work has established the composition of phospholipids and phospholipid-bound fatty acid esters and aldehydes in ram, bull, boar, human and rabbit spermatozoa (Scott, Voglmayr & Setchell, 1967; Pursel & Graham, 1967; Neill & Masters, 1972, 1973; Johnson, Pursel & Gerrits, 1972; Poulos & White, 1973; Poulos, Darin-Bennett & White, 1973; Darin-Bennett, Poulos & White, 1973b). These data led Poulos, Darin-Bennett & White (1973) to suggest that the spermatozoa of these species could be allocated to two groups on the basis of the ratio of the phospholipid-bound polyunsaturated:saturated fatty acids, which could be correlated with sensitivity to cold-shock. Thus, the ratio for the spermatozoa of ram, bull and boar, which are known to be very susceptible to cold-shock, is approximately three times the ratio found for the less sensitive spermatozoa of the rabbit and human