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B. C. WENTWORTH and W. J. MELLEN

Summary.

Young male Japanese quail were given serial injections of homologous testicular antigen by various routes, some with adjuvant and some without. Control birds were injected with isotonic saline or saline plus adjuvant. When the birds reached the age of sexual maturity, data were obtained on serum antibody titres, semen characteristics, testis weight and histology, and fertility of tester females.

The only two treatments which definitely induced immunity were those in which Freund's adjuvant was mixed with the antigen before injection (intraperitoneal or intramuscular). These two treatments resulted in detectable serum antibody titres against quail testis homogenate and also altered the testicular histology to a varying degree. The only tester females with significantly subnormal fertility were those inseminated with semen from the males injected intraperitoneally with antigen plus adjuvant. This semen was characterized by the lowest sperm density of any group and a high methylene-blue-reduction-time.

The observation that spermatozoal agglutination (head-to-head) occurred in the vasa deferentia of some males with serum anti-testis titres suggests that circulating sperm antibodies can enter the male reproductive tract.

As a result of this study, the male Coturnix can be added to the short list of animals in which active immunity and suppression of spermatogenesis have been induced by homologous testicular (spermatozoal) antigen.

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B. C. WENTWORTH and W. J. MELLEN

Summary.

A modification of the method of Burrows & Quinn (1939) was successfully used to collect semen from male Japanese quail, and females were artificially inseminated by intravaginal, intraperitoneal and intrauterine routes. Others were mated naturally. Semen from antibiotic-fed males, diluted with quail-egg albumin containing antibiotics, and deposited in the uterus (shell gland) by means of a hypodermic needle passed through the egg contained therein, fertilized more than 75% of the females for a mean duration of 4·6 days. This procedure also resulted in excellent egg production and caused no mortality. In contrast, the other methods of artificial insemination resulted in much lower fertility and egg production and, in some cases, heavy mortality.

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G. P. Birrenkott, W. H. Burke and B. C. Wentworth

Summary. The effects of oviduct removal, oviduct displacement or sham-operation were studied in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). No significant differences were observed between the treatments for body weight, number of follicles≥6 mm diam., or number of ruptured follicles. Retraction or removal of the oviduct resulted in similar significant increases (P < 0·05) in ovarian weight, diameter of the largest follicle, and serum LH levels when compared with the controls. Injection of yolk into normal hens did not cause any change. It is suggested that the oviduct normally exerts an inhibitory control on ovary growth without appreciable effect on ovulation rate.

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A. S. ANAND, K. W. THOMPSON, B. C. WENTWORTH and N. L. FIRST

This communication describes a very sensitive radioimmunoassay for determining the amount of LH-like substance present in samples of equine blood sera.

Antiserum to PMSG was developed in two rabbits. The immunization regimen consisted of ten doses of PMSG, each of 2·0 mg, administered intramuscularly weekly. Each dose was suspended in 1 ml 0·9% NaCl which was well emulsified with 1 ml of Freund's complete adjuvant. The PMSG had a potency of 4000 i.u./mg. One week after the last dose, a booster dose of 2·0 mg PMSG in 1 ml 0·9% NaCl was administered to each rabbit intravenously. One week after the booster dose, the rabbits were bled and the sera were pooled. The pooled sera were diluted 1:10 with 0·9% NaCl, flash frozen and