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  • Author: D. R. S. KIRBY x
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D. R. S. KIRBY

Summary.

During delayed implantation mouse blastocysts were transferred from the uterus to the animal's own kidney. Under the kidney capsule the blastocysts `implanted' and developed normally, whilst those in the uterus remained in delay. The implications of these findings are discussed.

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D. R. S. KIRBY

The operating board shown in the Plate was developed to facilitate parapharyngeal hypophysectomy in the mouse. It is essential for this operation to rigidly secure the animal, and to gently retract the trachea, muscles and blood vessels in the neck region. Moreover, as deeper tissues are dissected, the tension of the retractors holding the superficial layers must be constantly adjusted to 'take up the slack' and more clearly expose the base of the cranium. Retractors attached to rubber-bands, chain or string held in cleats at the side of the operating boards commonly in use, proved to be much inferior to those described here. The operating board consists of a plastic-covered wood and metal base and small powerful pot magnets ('Eclipse'), some of which hold the animal in the operating position, whilst others anchor the incision retractors. The board is robust, easy
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D. R. S. KIRBY

Summary.

Experimentally induced extra-uterine pregnancies (eup) in virgin mice did not stop the oestrous cycle, inhibit mating with ensuing pregnancy or stimulate the corpora lutea sufficiently to produce progestational changes in the genital tract. The eup, however, caused changes typically associated with pregnancy in the adrenal cortex and mammary glands. In the former the X-zone either completely disappeared or underwent degenerative changes. The mammary glands showed definite lobulo-alveolar development, not affected by adrenalectomy, but abolished both by ovariectomy and hypophysectomy.

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D. R. S. KIRBY

Summary.

The development of mouse blastocysts transplanted to the spleen is described. Sex, condition or pregnancy, or the fact that donor and host mice were of different strains did not affect their development. In only two cases did an embryo proper develop; one was very abnormal, the other was morphologically normal and healthy when the host was autopsied. The blastocysts gave rise to an exceedingly luxuriant growth of trophoblast, which destroyed the spleen in a very characteristic manner. First the vascular red pulp was removed, afterwards the white lymphatic tissue and trabeculae were destroyed. The trophoblast destroyed the host tissue solely by phagocytosis. The trophoblast developing on the spleen is remarkable for the large volume produced from one blastocyst, and also for the gigantic size of its nuclei which attain dimensions of 115 μ, sometimes within 7 days of the transplantation of the blastocyst.

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J. C. WOOD and D. R. S. KIRBY

Summary.

The presence of a thread in a limited region of the rat uterus causes a gain in weight throughout the length of the uterine horn which bears it. In addition, such a thread lessens, but does not inhibit completely, the decidual cell response which can be induced by uterine trauma. This inhibition increases progressively with the length of time that the device has been present. A mechanism is suggested to explain this effect.