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E. C. MATHER and H. E. DALE

Summary.

Bovine spermatozoa, washed or in seminal plasma, were incubated alone or in combination with oestrogenic and progestational endometrial preparations; oxygen consumption was determined for 1 hr.

Oxygen uptake by combinations of washed spermatozoa and endometrial preparations could be predicted by addition of the respiratory activity of the isolated tissues. When diluted whole semen was substituted for washed spermatozoa, oxygen uptake by the combined tissues was significantly less than that predicted by addition. The factor in seminal plasma responsible for the depression of respiratory activity was not identified.

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E. C. MATHER and H. E. DALE

Summary.

The oxygen uptake of bovine endometrium was less when perfused with seminal plasma than when perfused with Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution. Dialysing the seminal plasma against Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution did not alter the depressant action of the seminal plasma. The depressant substance was shown to be partially heat labile.

Variable mineral concentrations were not responsible for the respiratory depression of the endometrium. It was found, however, that calcium is contributed to the seminal plasma in various amounts and that this contribution is made in conjunction with or associated with the non-dialysable depressant substance. Calcium does not appear to be tightly bound to the non-dialysable material and its removal does not alter the depressant action.

It was shown that the degree of respiratory depression is related to the dry weight of non-dialysable seminal plasma.

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W. S. McDOWELL, E. C. MATHER and C. E. MARTIN

A study by Turker & Kiran (1969) revealed that single retrograde intraarterial (i.a.) injections of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) did not produce a change in milk-ejection pressure in the lactating rabbit, but could inhibit the milk-ejection response to oxytocin. The minimal dose range of PGE1 required to produce an inhibition of milk-ejection pressure by oxytocin was 0·1 to 1 μg PGE1 i.a.

Halder, Maiweg & Grosvenor (1970) showed that PGE1 could abolish the milk-ejection activity of oxytocin in the rat.

A study by McNeilly & Fox (1971) indicated that PGE1, PGE2, PGF and PGF, all possessed inherent milk-ejection activity in the guinea-pig. They found that in no case did the i.a. injection of any of these four prostaglandins in amounts up to 30 μg cause any decrease

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D. F. STANKE, D. W. DeYOUNG, J. D. SIKES and E. C. MATHER

A simple method for cannulation of the bovine oviducts permitting the collection of daily samples of secretions would enhance the study of fertility as well as contribute to knowledge in the field of embryo nutrition and development. Olds & VanDemark (1957) used a wringer technique to obtain oviduct secretions from slaughterhouse material. Carlson, Black & Howe (1970) described a procedure for the continuous collection of oviduct fluid from the cow. Cannulation of the oviduct was accomplished with a single silastic cannula held in the oviduct by two collars sutured to the ovarian end of the oviduct. Numerous oviducal fluid collection systems have been used with varying degrees of success. Hamner & Fox (1969) reviewed collection