Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: G. I. M. SWYER x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

G. I. M. SWYER

Summary.

The results of artificial insemination with the husband's semen (aih) are reported on 114 patients whose ages ranged from 22 to 43 years. Seven patients used self-insemination; two of these had three pregnancies, and, of the remaining five, two conceived by doctorinsemination. Excluding the self-inseminations, a total of 880 inseminations were made and resulted in twenty pregnancies, i.e. an average of forty-four inseminations per pregnancy. But, fifty-one patients gave up after they had had six or fewer inseminations and seventy-five (including those still undergoing insemination but excluding those who had conceived) had fewer than twelve inseminations. The actual number of inseminations needed to produce a pregnancy varied from one (three cases) to forty-two (one case) and more than 50% of conceptions occurred with less than six inseminations. The successful inseminations were intra-uterine in four cases and intra-cervical in sixteen. Seventyfive per cent of the successful inseminations were made between cycle Days 10 and 15, the mean cycle lengths in these cases ranging between 25·8±3·1 and 32·4±2·5 days.

Ten of the patients in the series conceived without aih. Three of these had previously had ai pregnancies, the other seven having failed to conceive by aih.

Free access

G. I. M. SWYER

INTRODUCTION

I am very sensible of the honour accorded to me today by the Oliver Bird Trustees in inviting me to give this, the 10th Annual Oliver Bird Lecture. I am particularly glad that you, Professor Parkes, should be my chairman on this occasion, just 20 years after you accorded me the privilege of becoming a member of your staff at the National Institute for Medical Research. I was then very much an amateur in the field of reproductive physiology and, looking back, I have the impression that most of my colleagues were also amateurs, in the best possible sense. The days of the rat-race, of fierce competition and of, one might almost say, brittle professionalism, had not yet begun. Our interests were then more closely concerned with the promotion of fertility than with its control in the negative sense, and we had not yet become alarmed about the

Free access

N. R. HARDY, LINDA LEWIS, VALERIE LITTLE and G. I. M. SWYER

Summary.

A study of the correlation between a positive spot test for chloride in cervical mucus and the occurrence of ovulation, as indicated by the peak of the karyopycnotic index in the vaginal smear, has been made. The brightest positive spot coincides with, or occurs a few days before, the probable day of ovulation—too late to be of value for contraception by the rhythm method but of potential value to couples desiring conception, especially as the woman can easily use the test herself. Anovulatory patients treated with gonadotrophins show a positive chloride spot when the ovary responds to follicle-stimulating hormone.