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  • Author: G. J. R. HOVELL x
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J. L. HANCOCK and G. J. R. HOVELL

Summary.

A technique is described for the surgical recovery of ova from the sow's uterus. With this technique 118 ova were recovered from eight of a total of nine sows operated on 3 to 5 days after the onset of heat. A total of eighty-six ova were transferred to the uteri of six sows of which three farrowed. These three sows had received eighteen, fourteen and ten ova and gave birth to litters of twelve, thirteen and six pigs, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to factors affecting the fertility of inseminated pigs.

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J. L. HANCOCK and G. J. R. HOVELL

Summary.

The results are described of transfers of ova between sheep.

Where necessary, treatment with progesterone was used to synchronize the heats of donor and recipient ewes. pms was used to increase the number of ova shed by donor ewes. Data are given on the onset of heat after treatment in donor and recipient ewes and on the numbers of ova shed, recovered and fertilized among donor ewes.

Of a total of fifty transfers, twenty-six were successful; most of the successful transfers were made to untreated recipients and to treated recipients in which transfer was delayed until the second heat after treatment with progesterone.

Factors that may have affected the success of transfers were: failure to synchronize heats of donors and recipients; the transfer, in progesterone-treated ewes, of ova at the first cycle after treatment; omission of antibiotics from the serum used for recovery, storage in vitro and transfer of ova; the clinical (scrapie) history of the experimental ewes.

There was no evidence of any effect of the time of storage in vitro (up to 5½ hr) on the success of transfers among ova transferred on the day of recovery.

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G. J. R. HOVELL, R. CULLEN and K. BROWN-GRANT

The infusion of solutions of iodine into the uterus through the cervical canal has been practised as a therapeutic measure in certain cases of infertility in farm animals. Little is known about the possible mode of action of such treatment, though Ekman, Holmberg, Settergren & Thorell (1965) have shown that iodide is rapidly absorbed from the uterine lumen in the cow and have suggested that systemic as well as local effects might be involved. On the other hand, iodide has been shown to be present in the cervical mucus in women at a concentration above that in plasma (see Brown-Grant, 1961, for references) and in the rat, a very high concentration of iodide relative to plasma has been demonstrated in the oviduct and

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G. J. R. HOVELL, G. M. ARDRAN, D. M. ESSENHIGH and J. C. SMITH

Summary.

Observations on the urogenital tract were made radiologically in six rams. Contrast medium was first introduced to the urethra or vas deferens before electrical stimulation was applied per rectum and later to the vas during a series of stimuli to induce ejaculation.

Without stimulation, contrast medium reaching the pelvic urethra from either the penile urethra or the ampulla was generally expelled in a retrograde manner to the bladder, while residual material in the penile urethra was voided.

Ejaculation took place only during pauses between stimuli, fluid being discharged from the ampulla straight through into the penile urethra. This main discharge was followed by some reflux of fluid from the pelvic urethra to the bladder. At rest, no fluid remained in either the pelvic or the penile urethra.