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  • Author: M. H. BENNETT x
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J. P. BENNETT and H. M. DOTT

Summary.

Epididymal contents were collected from a bull with an epididymal fistula and from normal bulls after slaughter. When this material was diluted with seminal plasma collected by means of an artificial vagina from either the bull with a fistula or from normal bulls, the impedance change frequency due to the motility of the spermatozoa was reduced as was the length of time for which it could be detected. The fluid obtained from the penis of the bull during electric stimulation with a low voltage did not produce the same effect. The latter fluid had no fructose, a low protein content and a different pattern of inorganic ion concentration from the seminal plasma; the agar gel electrophoresis pattern was also different.

Dilution of epididymal contents with normal seminal plasma did not affect the morphology of spermatozoa or their response to differential staining. Furthermore, neither these characteristics nor the impedance change frequency were affected by a mild degree of temperature shock produced by sudden cooling from 20° C to 10° C.

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R. D. PEPPLER, M. H. BENNETT and J. D. DUNN

Summary.

Thirty-two prepubertal, female rats (Southern Farms) were allocated to intact control, bilateral optic enucleation (blinded), bilateral olfactory bulb removal (anosmic) and blinded—anosmic groups. Olfactory bulbs were surgically removed between 27 and 29 days of age and eyes were removed at 30 days of age. One ovary was removed from each animal between 107 and 112 days of age on Day 2 (metoestrus) of the oestrous cycle. The number of eggs ovulated was determined by flushing the oviducts with normal saline solution. All rats completed one oestrous cycle and were killed at metoestrus of the following cycle. There was no difference in the number of ova shed between the four groups at the time of removal of the first ovary. One cycle later, compensatory ovulation was found at autopsy to have occurred in all animals. Controls ovulated 10·3±0·5 eggs; blinded, 9·6±0·7; anosmic, 10·3±0·3; and blinded—anosmic, 9·7±0·8. Follicular development was quantitatively analysed in both intact and hemispayed blinded and/or anosmic rats. These data suggest that pituitary—ovarian function as evaluated by the number of eggs ovulated is not affected by blinding and/or anosmia.