Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: N. E. SKAKKEBÆK x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

N. E. SKAKKEBÆK and C. G. HELLER

Summary.

In order to provide a reference for evaluation of spermatogenesis in patients suspected of having quantitative abnormalities, eighteen bilateral and three unilateral biopsies from twenty-one fertile men with normal chromosome complements were investigated. A quantitative analysis was performed, employing the Sertoli cell number as a basis for reference. The inter-individual variation in the so-called `Sertoli cell ratio' (germ cell/Sertoli cell) between individuals was relatively low and no significant difference between the right and left side was found.

It is concluded that the method has several advantages in studies using group controls.

Free access

N. E. SKAKKEBÆK and R. A. BEATTY

Since Cohen, Marinello & Back (1967) first reported an effect of LSD on human chromosomes, several workers have shown an increased frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in leucocytes in patients who have been treated with the drug or who have illegally taken it (Cohen, Hirschhorn & Frosch, 1967; Irwin & Egozcue, 1967; Nielsen, Friedrich, Jacobsen & Tsuboi, 1968; Hungerford, Taylor, Shagass, La Badie, Balaban & Paton, 1968). Other workers were unable to demonstrate any effect of the drug on the chromosomes in human leucocytes (Loughman, Sargent & Israelstam, 1967; Bender & Siva-Sankar, 1968; Sparkes, Melnyk & Bozzetti, 1968). Experimental investigations have given preliminary evidence of an effect of LSD on meiotic chromosomes in mice (Skakkebæk, Philip &
Free access

N. E. SKAKKEBÆK, MAJ HULTÉN, PETREA JACOBSEN and MARGARETA MIKKELSEN

Summary.

Eight XYY men were investigated by a quantitative, histological analysis of the seminiferous epithelium. All but one had testes of normal size. Biopsy material from three men showed normal spermatogenesis, while severe impairment was found in a substantial number of the tubules in biopsies from five of the patients. The abnormalities included arrest of spermatogenesis at the primary spermatocyte level and tubules containing only Sertoli cells. These results correlate well with sperm counts which range from normal numbers to total aspermia.

Normal plasma levels of gonadotrophins were found in five of the six subjects examined; one of the six had a significantly increased level of FSH and another, an increased level of LH.

Free access

N. E. Skakkebaek, R. W. Kelly and C. S. Corker

M.R.C. Unit of Reproductive Biology, 2 Forrest Road, Edinburgh EH1 2QW, U.K. and *The Fertility Clinic, University Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Although it has been known for more than 40 years that human semen contains prostaglandins, only recently have 19-hydroxyprostaglandin E-1 and E-2 (19-OH PGEs) been identified as the major prostaglandins in the semen of normal, fertile men (Taylor & Kelly, 1974; Jonsson, Middleditch & Desiderio, 1975). Nothing is known about the control of synthesis and release of these compounds, although there is evidence that the smooth muscle-stimulating activity of human semen, which is attributed to prostaglandins, is androgen dependent (Sturde, 1968). To investigate the role of androgens in the production of 19-OH PGEs, we have measured prostaglandin concentrations in repeated semen samples from two hypogonadal men before and during treatment with testosterone.

Patient 1 was unmarried, aged 26 years; he suffered from a lack of

Free access

N. E. SKAKKEBÆK, JEAN I. BRYANT and J. PHILIP

Summary.

The meiotic chromosomes in diakinesis—metaphase I (MI) and metaphase II (MII) of eighteen controls and seventy-four infertile men with a normal 46,XY chromosome complement were investigated. The MII/MI ratio was decreased in the infertile group. The difference in mean chiasma frequency between the two groups was not statistically significant, but there was a significant variation between individuals. In three infertile men, a small proportion of cells in MI contained indistinct, grossly fragmented chromosomes with low chiasma frequency. The non-pairing of sex chromosomes and homologous autosomes in MI was the same in the controls and infertile men. One hundred and seventy-four cells (15%) of 1159 cells contained non-paired sex chromosomes and in six cells (0·5%), two small homologous chromosomes were separated. Non-pairing may give rise to zygotes with abnormal chromosome complements. The relative number of polyploid cells in MII, but not in spermatogonial metaphase and MI, was significantly increased in the infertile men. No structural abnormalities were detected.