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A. TADMOR, H. SCHINDLER and ORA KEMPENICH-PINTO

Summary.

In nine out of eleven operations, fistulae were established in the vas deferens of rams. This was accomplished by incising the vas deferens and suturing the orifice to a small surgical opening in the dorsal surface of the scrotum, close to the incision through which the vas deferens had been exposed.

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H. SCHINDLER, ORA KEMPENICH-PINTO, HANA BRODA and E. BEN-DAVID

The percentage of fertilized eggs from chicken hens inseminated with turkey semen is very low (Warren & Scott, 1935; Quinn, Burrows & Byerley, 1937; Asmundsen & Lorenz, 1957; Wisoki & Soller, 1968), but it can be considerably increased by depositing the spermatozoa beyond the utero-vaginal junction (Kempenich-Pinto, Schindler, Bornstein & Baroutchieva, 1970). The question arose whether the insemination techniques also affected the accumulation of the turkey spermatozoa in the chicken oviduct. Therefore, in the present work, the storage of turkey spermatozoa in the chicken hen oviduct was studied by histological examinations after intravaginal inseminations or inseminations beyond the utero-vaginal junction. Semen obtained from a local strain of Broad Breasted White Empire turkey toms was washed and diluted to its original volume with Tyrode solution containing chloramphenicol (500 μg/ml). S.C. White Leghorn hens were inseminated with 0·2
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ORA KEMPENICH-PINTO, H. SCHINDLER, S. BORNSTEIN and MATY BAROUTCHIEVA

The possibility of obtaining hybrids between the domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus) and the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) with artificial insemination by the vaginal route, has been studied by a number of authors (Warren & Scott, 1935; Quinn, Burrows & Byerley, 1937; Asmundsen & Lorenz, 1957; Olsen, 1960; Poole & Olsen, 1967). Although the rooster × turkey hen cross resulted in higher fertility (9% to 20%) than the reciprocal cross (0·8% to 5·0%), the potential exploitation of the former is limited by the relatively low egg production of the turkey hen. Therefore, it was deemed of interest to re-examine the fertilization rate obtainable in the turkey tom × chicken hen cross. In this laboratory, Wisoki & Soller (1968) inseminated S.C. White Leghorn hens by the vaginal