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  • Author: R. E. MANCINI x
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L. DEBELJUK and R. E. MANCINI

It is well known that steroids secreted by the Leydig cells inhibit gonadotrophin secretion (Ramirez & McCann, 1965; Bogdanove, 1967). Three decades ago, it was suggested that some cellular component of the seminiferous tubule might regulate the secretion of pituitary gonadotrophins (Vigdoff, Hill, Vehrs & Kubin, 1939; McCullagh & Schaffenburgh, 1952). Although later findings (Allanson & Deanesly, 1962; Katsh & Duncan, 1968) seemed to offer some support to this hypothesis, no conclusive proof has yet been presented. Moreover, testicular extract or a glycoprotein substance related to germinal cells administered to intact and castrated male rats, failed to demonstrate an inhibitory effect on pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations (Debeljuk & Mancini, 1970). The purpose of the present work was to achieve selective damage of spermatogonia in rat testes, temporarily arresting the

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A. L. KIERSZENBAUM and R. E. MANCINI

Experimental allergic orchitis is an organ-specific disorder, which is immunologically mediated, but interpretations of histopathological and immunological studies of the temporal sequence of events leading to aspermatogenesis still remain controversial. Some authors have held that degeneration of germinal cells of the testis is the predominant change which results in aspermatogenesis (Freund, Lipton & Thompson, 1953; Freund, Thompson & Lipton, 1955). On the other hand, destruction of the germinal epithelium has been described following the appearance of early mononuclear infiltrates in the intertubular space with direct invasion of the seminiferous tubules (Waksman, 1959), and the route of sperm passage through the rete testis, the ductulis efferentes and the caput epididymidis (Brown, Glynn & Holborow, 1963; Brown & Glynn, 1969; Johnson, 1970). Tung, Unanue & Dixon (1970) postulated that mononuclear cells can break through the basement membrane and penetrate into the seminiferous tubules. Infarction, oedema and ischaemia have all been causally related

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A. C. SEIGUER and R. E. MANCINI

Summary.

Ferrocyanide was detected histologically in adult rat testes by the Prussian blue reaction from 3 min to 3 hr following intravenous injection. Ferrocyanide appeared in the lumen of the testicular blood vessels almost immediately following injection. After 10 min, ferrocyanide was detected in most seminiferous tubule walls and, 20 to 30 min later, Prussian blue deposits were localized in the lumen and epithelium of some seminiferous tubules. The results suggest that the continuity of the extratubular and intratubular ferrocyanide compartments is interrupted in part by tubular wall structures. Possible explanations for the intratubular diffusion of ferrocyanide are discussed.

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J. A. ARAGON, LIVIA LUSTIG and R. E. MANCINI

Mancini, Vilar, Alvarez & Seiguer (1965) have demonstrated the passage through the blood—testis barrier of labelled serum proteins injected intravenously into rats. Horseradish peroxidase was earlier introduced as a tracer by Straus (1957a) and applied to the ultrastructural level by Karnovsky (1965) and Graham & Karnovsky (1966).

Sedar (1966a, b) reported, in two abstracts, that horseradish peroxidase injected intravenously into the hamster became localized in the epididymis and ductuli efferentes, and in the rete testis. Reddy & Svoboda (1967) observed that horseradish peroxidase injected intravenously into the rat was taken up by the cells of the testis. Recently, Fawcett, Leak & Heidger (1970), studying the permeability of the blood—testis barrier in guinea-pigs, reported the uptake of horseradish peroxidase injected interstitially in the testis.

The different results obtained

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S. CHEVIAKOFF, J. C. CALAMERA, M. MORGENFELD and R. E. MANCINI

Several publications have pointed out the deleterious action exerted by cytostatic drugs on human spermatogenesis (Heller, Flegeolli & Watson, 1963; Richter, Calamera, Morgenfeld, Kierszenbaum, Lavieri & Mancini, 1970; Fairley, Barrié & Johnson, 1972). As many of the patients who receive cytostatic drugs often have a normal life expectancy, it was considered of interest to study the reappearance of spermatogenesis during variable periods of time after withdrawal of treatment. Van Thiel, Sherins, Myers & De Vita (1972) pointed out that in a group of such men in remission for 1 to 5 years after treatment with different drugs, persistent azoospermia was present in five out of seven of the treated individuals.

This report concerns observations on a group of five patients with lymphoma who recovered spermatogenesis either partially or totally after treatment with Chlorambucil was suspended. The average age of the patients was 26 years. The daily dose of Chlorambucil was

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R. E. MANCINI, A. ALONSO, J. BARQUET, B. ALVAREZ and M. NEMIROVSKY

Summary.

A highly purified and potent hyaluronidase preparation extracted from bull testis was employed to induce heterologous antibody by sensitizing adult rabbits. Specific anti-enzyme antibodies were demonstrated by Ouchterlony's method, and by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (pca), and haemagglutination and complement fixation tests. In order to localize the cellular site of the accumulation of the enzyme, direct and indirect immunofluorescent techniques were applied to tissue sections and to isolated germ cells of adult bull testis. Specific fluorescence adequately checked by control reactions appeared in the perinuclear area of spermatids, in the acrosomes of spermatozoa and with less certainty in the cytoplasm of other cells tentatively identified as spermatocytes. Non-specific fluorescence could be seen in the basal cell line of the seminiferous tubules.