Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author: Shuang Li x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Xiaotong Wu X Wu, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Xiaotong Wu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yan Shi Y Shi, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Yan Shi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bingjie Hu B Hu, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Bingjie Hu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Panpan Zhao P Zhao, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Panpan Zhao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shuang Li S Li, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Shuang Li in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lieying Xiao L Xiao, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Lieying Xiao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shaohua Wang S Wang, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Shaohua Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Kun Zhang K Zhang, college of animal sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Kun Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Tead4, a critical transcription factor expressed during preimplantation development, is essential for the expression of trophectoderm-specific genes in mice. However, the functional mechanism of TEAD4 in mouse preimplantation development and its conservation across mammals remain unclear. Here, we report that Tead4 is a crucial transcription factor necessary for blastocyst formation in mice. Disruption of Tead4 through base editing results in developmental arrest at the morula stage. Additionally, RNA-seq analysis reveals dysregulation of 670 genes in Tead4 knockout embryos. As anticipated, Tead4 knockout led to a decrease in trophectoderm genes Cdx2 and Gata3. Intriguingly, we observed a reduction in Krt8, suggesting that Tead4 influences the integrity of the trophectoderm epithelium in mice. More importantly, we noted a dramatic decrease in nuclear Yap in outside cells for Tead4-deficient morula, indicating that Tead4 directly regulates Hippo signaling. In contrast, bovine embryos with TEAD4 depletion could still develop to blastocysts with normal expression of CDX2, GATA3, and SOX2, albeit with a decrease in total cell number and ICM cell number. In conclusion, we propose that Tead4 regulates mouse blastocyst formation via Krt8 and Yap, both of which are critical regulators of mouse preimplantation development.

Restricted access
Bang-Hong Wei The Sperm Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Bang-Hong Wei in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jia-Hao Ni The Sperm Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Jia-Hao Ni in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Tong Yang The Sperm Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Tong Yang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shuang-Li Hao The Sperm Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Shuang-Li Hao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Wan-Xi Yang The Sperm Laboratory, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Wan-Xi Yang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

PIWI proteins play important roles in germline development in the mammals. However, the functions of PIWIs in crustaceans remain unknown. In the present study, we identified three Piwis from the testis of Eriocheir sinensis (E. sinensis). Three Piwi genes encoded proteins with typical features of PIWI subfamilies and were highly expressed in the testis. Three PIWIs could be detected in the cytoplasm of spermatocytes and spermatids, while in spermatozoa, we could only detect PIWI1 and PIWI3 in the nucleus. The knockdown of PIWIs by dsRNA significantly affected the formation of the nuclei in spermatozoa, which resulted in deviant and irregular nuclei. PIWI defects significantly inhibited the apoptosis of abnormal germ cells through the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway and p53 pathway. Knockdown of PIWIs inhibited the expression of caspase (Casp) 3, 7, 8, and p53 without affecting Bcl2 (B-cell lymphoma gene 2), Bax (B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X), and BaxI (B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X inhibitor), which further significantly increased abnormal spermatozoa in the knockdown-group crabs. These results show a new role of PIWI proteins in crustaceans that is different from that in mammals. In summary, PIWIs play roles in the formation of the germline nucleus and can maintain apoptosis in abnormal germ cells to remove abnormal germ cells in E. sinensis.

Restricted access
Yan Shi Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Yan Shi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bingjie Hu Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Bingjie Hu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Zizengchen Wang Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Zizengchen Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Xiaotong Wu Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Xiaotong Wu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lei Luo Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Lei Luo in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shuang Li Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Shuang Li in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shaohua Wang Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Shaohua Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Kun Zhang Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Kun Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Huanan Wang Laboratory of Mammalian Molecular Embryology, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Search for other papers by Huanan Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

In brief

The lineage specification during early embryonic development in cattle remains largely elusive. The present study determines the effects of trophectoderm-associated factors GATA3 and CDX2 on lineage specification during bovine early embryonic development.

Abstract

Current understandings of the initiation of the trophectoderm (TE) program during mammalian embryonic development lack evidence of how TE-associated factors such as GATA3 and CDX2 participate in bovine lineage specification. In this study, we describe the effects of TE-associated factors on the expression of lineage specification marker genes such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG, GATA6, and SOX17, by using cytosine base editor system. We successfully knockout GATA3 or CDX2 in bovine embryos with a robust efficiency. However, GATA3 or CDX2 deletion does not affect the developmental potential of embryos to reach the blastocyst stage. Interestingly, GATA3 deletion downregulates the NANOG expression in bovine blastocysts. Further analysis of the mosaic embryos shows that GATA3 is required for NANOG in the TE of bovine blastocysts. Single blastocyst RNA-seq analysis reveals that GATA3 deletion disrupts the transcriptome in bovine blastocysts. Altogether, we propose that GATA3 plays an important role in maintaining TE lineage program in bovine embryos and the functional role of GATA3 is species-specific.

Open access
Xue Li Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China
Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Xue Li in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Zhi-Yan Shan Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Zhi-Yan Shan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yan-Shuang Wu Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Yan-Shuang Wu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Xing-Hui Shen Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Xing-Hui Shen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chun-Jia Liu Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Chun-Jia Liu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jing-Ling Shen Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Jing-Ling Shen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Zhong-Hua Liu Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Zhong-Hua Liu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Lei Lei Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Life Science, Department of Physiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China

Search for other papers by Lei Lei in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Pig pluripotent cells may represent an advantageous experimental tool for developing therapeutic application in the human biomedical field. However, it has previously been proven to be difficult to establish from the early embryo and its pluripotency has not been distinctly documented. In recent years, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology provides a new method of reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent state. The generation of iPS cells together with or without certain small molecules has become a routine technique. However, the generation of iPS cells from pig embryonic tissues using viral infections together with small molecules has not been reported. Here, we reported the generation of induced pig pluripotent cells (iPPCs) using the iPS technology in combination with valproic acid (VPA). VPA treatment significantly increased the expression of pluripotent genes and played an important role in early reprogramming. We showed that iPPCs resembled pig epiblast cells in their morphology and pluripotent markers, such as OCT4, NANOG, and SSEA1. It had a normal karyotype and could form embryoid bodies, which express three germ layer markers in vitro. In addition, the iPPCs might directly differentiate into neural progenitors after being induced with the retinoic acid and extracellular matrix. Our study established a reasonable method to generate pig pluripotent cells, which might be a new donor cell source for human neural disease therapy.

Free access
Xiaotong Wu Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Xiaotong Wu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yan Shi Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Yan Shi in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bingjie Hu Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Bingjie Hu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Panpan Zhao Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Panpan Zhao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shuang Li Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Shuang Li in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Lieying Xiao Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Lieying Xiao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shaohua Wang Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Shaohua Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Kun Zhang Key Laboratory of Dairy Cow Genetic Improvement and Milk Quality Research of Zhejiang Province, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

Search for other papers by Kun Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

In brief

Lineage specification plays a vital role in preimplantation development. TEAD4 is an essential transcription factor for trophectoderm lineage specification in mice but not in cattle.

Abstract

Tead4, a critical transcription factor expressed during preimplantation development, is essential for the expression of trophectoderm-specific genes in mice. However, the functional mechanism of TEAD4 in mouse preimplantation development and its conservation across mammals remain unclear. Here, we report that Tead4 is a crucial transcription factor necessary for blastocyst formation in mice. Disruption of Tead4 through base editing results in developmental arrest at the morula stage. Additionally, RNA-seq analysis reveals dysregulation of 670 genes in Tead4 knockout embryos. As anticipated, Tead4 knockout led to a decrease in trophectoderm genes Cdx2 and Gata3. Intriguingly, we observed a reduction in Krt8, suggesting that Tead4 influences the integrity of the trophectoderm epithelium in mice. More importantly, we noted a dramatic decrease in nuclear Yap in outside cells for Tead4-deficient morula, indicating that Tead4 directly regulates Hippo signaling. In contrast, bovine embryos with TEAD4 depletion could still develop to blastocysts with normal expression of CDX2, GATA3, and SOX2, albeit with a decrease in total cell number and ICM cell number. In conclusion, we propose that Tead4 regulates mouse blastocyst formation via Krt8 and Yap, both of which are critical regulators of mouse preimplantation development.

Restricted access
Xue Zhang Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Xue Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Bo-Yin Tan Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Bo-Yin Tan in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shuang Zhang The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Shuang Zhang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Qian Feng Department of Gynecology, Chongqing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Qian Feng in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ying Bai Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Ying Bai in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Shi-Quan Xiao Department of Reproductive Medicine, The Third affiliated hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Shi-Quan Xiao in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Xue-Mei Chen Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Xue-Mei Chen in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jun-Lin He Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Jun-Lin He in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Xue-Qing Liu Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Xue-Qing Liu in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Ying-Xiong Wang Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Ying-Xiong Wang in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Yu-Bin Ding Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Yu-Bin Ding in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Fang-Fang Li Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
The Joint International Research Laboratory of Reproduction and Development, Ministry of Education, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China

Search for other papers by Fang-Fang Li in
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Decidualization of uterine stromal cells plays an important role in the establishment of normal pregnancy. Previous studies have demonstrated that Acyl-CoA binding protein (Acbp) is critical to cellular proliferation, differentiation, mitochondrial functions, and autophagy. The characterization and physiological function of Acbp during decidualization remain largely unknown. In the present study, we conducted the expression profile of Acbp in the endometrium of early pregnant mice. With the occurrence of decidualization, the expression of Acbp gradually increased. Similarly, Acbp expression was also strongly expressed in decidualized cells following artificial decidualization, both in vivo and in vitro. We applied the mice pseudopregnancy model to reveal that the expression of Acbp in the endometrium of early pregnant mice was not induced by embryonic signaling. Moreover, P4 significantly upregulated the expression of Acbp, whereas E2 appeared to have no regulating effect on Acbp expression in uterine stromal cells. Concurrently, we found that interfering with Acbp attenuated decidualization, and that might due to mitochondrial dysfunctions and the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The level of autophagy was increased after knocking down Acbp. During induced decidualization, the expression of ACBP was decreased with the treatment of rapamycin (an autophagy inducer), while increased with the addition of Chloroquine (an autophagy inhibitor). Our work suggests that Acbp plays an essential role in the proliferation and differentiation of stromal cells during decidualization through regulating mitochondrial functions, fatty acid oxidation, and autophagy.

Restricted access