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  • Author: V. S. N. RAO x
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V. S. N. RAO and P. L. SHARMA

Summary.

The effect of oral (100 mg/kg) and intraperitoneal (10 mg/kg) administration of (+)-INPEA on contractions of the isolated rat uterus evoked by PGE1, PGE2 and PGF has been investigated. Administration of (+)-INPEA by both routes increased the sensitivity of the uterus to each of the prostaglandins studied. Since (+)-INPEA appears to be non-toxic, its potentiating action may enable clinicians to use smaller doses of prostaglandins for therapeutic abortion or for the induction of labour.

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V. S. N. Rao, M. C. Chaves and R. A. Ribeiro

The role of nitric oxide in the uterotrophic action of oestradiol after 6 h or 72 h was studied in immature (19–21 days old) female Wistar rats by use of l-arginine, the amino acid from which nitric oxide is synthesized, and N ω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. Oestradiol at single s.c. doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 μg per rat induced dose-dependent uterine oedema in 6 h. l-NAME (10 and 20 mg kg−1, i.p.) administered 30 min before oestradiol (10 μg per rat) injection suppressed the formation of uterine oedema in a dose-related manner. This action of l-NAME on oestradiol-induced uterine oedema was effectively blocked by pretreatment of rats with l-arginine (600 mg kg−1, s.c.), a precursor of nitric oxide, but not by l-lysine, an amino acid not involved in the generation of nitric oxide. In addition, l-NAME at similar doses significantly prevented oestradiol-induced (3 μg per rat, s.c. on three successive days) increases in uterine growth after 72 h; however, this effect was mitigated by l-arginine (600 mg kg−1). These results suggest the involvement of an l-arginine–nitric oxide system in the oestradiol-induced uterotrophic effect in immature rats.

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A. N. THAKUR, A. R. SHETH, T. V. PURANDARE, S. R. MUNSHI and SHANTA S. RAO

Summary.

The effect of antisera to ovine LH and ovine prolactin was studied on polyamine levels in the mouse placenta. The antisera were administered on Day 11, 12 or 13 of pregnancy and the mice were killed 24 hr later. The polyamines (spermine, spermidine and putrescine) in the placentae were estimated. Polyamine levels were reduced after treatment with anti-LH on any of the 3 days and after treatment with anti-prolactin serum on Days 11 or 12. Only the spermidine content was reduced when anti-prolactin serum was injected on Day 13 of pregnancy. Placental DNA and RNA levels paralleled those observed for polyamine content. The changes in polyamine content and nucleic acid levels indicate that these antisera to LH and prolactin interfere with placental function.

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V. K. Naik, A. N. Thakur, A. R. Sheth, U. M. Joshi, S. S. Rao, D. S. Pardanani, J. K. Kulsreshtha and R. K. Handa

Studies on the effects of vasectomy on hormone levels and accessory reproductive organ function in man have shown that there are no significant alterations in the levels of serum LH and FSH (Wieland, Hallberg, Zorn, Klein & Luria, 1972; Johnsonbaugh, O'Connell, Engel, Edson & Sode, 1975; Varma, Varma, Johanson, Kowarski & Migeon, 1975) or testosterone (Bunge, 1972; Wieland et al., 1972; Johnsonbaugh et al., 1975; Varma et al., 1975), although Smith, Tcholankian, Chowdary & Steinberger (1976) reported a significant increase in plasma testosterone and LH levels 1 year after vasectomy. Kobrinsky, Winter, Reyes & Faiman (1976) found an acute fall in FSH and testosterone concentrations: subsequently, FSH remained below while LH and testosterone returned to the prevasectomy level (Kobrinsky et al., 1976).