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Xiaoli Chen, Huabin Zhu, Chuanhuo Hu, Haisheng Hao, Junfang Zhang, Kunpeng Li, Xueming Zhao, Tong Qin, Kan Zhao, Huishan Zhu, and Dong Wang

Cryodamage is a major problem in semen cryopreservation, causing changes in the levels of proteins that influence the function and motility of spermatozoa. In this study, protein samples prepared from fresh and frozen–thawed boar spermatozoa were compared using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling technique coupled to 2D LC–MS/MS analysis. A total of 41 differentially expressed proteins were identified and quantified, including 35 proteins that were present at higher levels and six proteins that were present at lower levels in frozen–thawed spermatozoa by at least a mean of 1.79-fold (P<0.05). On classifying into ten distinct categories using bioinformatic analysis, most of the 41 differentially expressed proteins were found to be closely relevant to sperm premature capacitation, adhesions, energy supply, and sperm–oocyte binding and fusion. The expression of four of these proteins, SOD1, TPI1, ODF2, and AKAP3, was verified by western blot analysis. We propose that alterations in these identified proteins affect the quality of cryopreserved semen and ultimately lower its fertilizing capacity. This is the first study to compare protein levels in fresh and frozen–thawed spermatozoa using the iTRAQ technology. Our preliminary results provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms of cryodamage in frozen–thawed spermatozoa and theoretical guidance to improve the cryopreservation of boar semen.

Open access

Yu-chen Zhang, Xiao-li Qin, Xiao-ling Ma, Hui-qin Mo, Shi Qin, Cheng-xi Zhang, Xiao-wei Wei, Xue-qing Liu, Yan Zhang, Fu-ju Tian, and Yi Lin

Preeclampsia is a gestational hypertensive disease; however, preeclampsia remains poorly understood. Bioinformatics analysis was applied to find novel genes involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identified CLDN1 as one of the most differentially expressed genes when comparing patients with preeclampsia and healthy controls. The results of the qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry experiments demonstrated that CLDN1 was significantly downregulated in the chorionic villi in samples from patients with preeclampsia. Furthermore, knockdown of CLDN1 in HTR-8/SVneo cells resulted in the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis, and overexpression of CLDN1 reversed these effects. In addition, RNA-seq assays demonstrated that the gene BIRC3 is potentially downstream of CLDN1 and is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Knockdown of CLDN1 confirmed that the expression level of BIRC3 was obviously decreased and was associated with a significant increase in cleaved PARP. Interestingly, the apoptotic effect in CLDN1 knockdown cells was rescued after BIRC3 overexpression. Overall, these results indicate that a decrease in CLDN1 inhibits BIRC3 expression and increases cleaved PARP levels thus participating in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

Free access

Xiaoli Qin, Yan Chen, Jiangjing Yuan, Xiaorui Liu, Weihong Zeng, and Yi Lin

Abnormal growth and migration of trophoblast cells is one of the main causes of spontaneous abortion. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) plays an important role in trophoblast cell growth and migration; however, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we first confirmed that eIF5A knockdown reduced human chorionic trophoblast HTR8 cells viability, proliferation, and migration. Next, we sought to systematically identify the genes regulated by eIF5A and observed changes in the transcriptome profile of eIF5A-knockdown HTR8 cells by RNA-seq analysis. Especially, we found that inhibition of eIF5A reduced both the mRNA and protein levels of methyltransferase-like protein 14 (METTL14). Furthermore, inhibition of METTL14 expression resulted in the reduction of viability, proliferation, and migration of HTR8 cells. In addition, we showed that overexpression of METTL14 rescued the effects of eIF5A knockdown in HTR8 cells. Finally, we revealed that eIF5A and METTL14 expression was decreased in spontaneous abortion samples compared to that in elective-induced abortion samples. Collectively, our study demonstrated that eIF5A plays a crucial role in HTR8 cells via modulation of METTL14 expression and may serve as a novel potential target for spontaneous abortion diagnosis and treatment.