SEX CHROMATIN FORMATION IN THE BLASTOCYST OF THE ROE DEER (CAPREOLUS CAPREOLUS) DURING DELAYED IMPLANTATION

in Reproduction
Author: R. J. AITKEN
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According to the Lyon hypothesis (Lyon, 1961, 1972), random genetic inactivation of one of the two X chromosomes occurs in the somatic cells of female mammals at an early stage of embryonic development. Certain properties of this inactivated chromosome, such as its late replication during the S-phase of mitosis (Taylor, 1960; Grumbach & Morishima, 1962; Mukherjee & Sinha, 1963), heteropyknosis during prophase and the formation of a sex chromatin body during interphase (Ohno, Kaplan & Kinosita, 1959; Ohno & Hauschka, 1960) have been used as criteria for establishing when the process of inactivation begins. These features first appear in blastocysts at about the time of implantation in the cat (Austin & Amoroso, 1957), dog (Austin, 1966), rat (Zybina, 1960), hamster (Hill & Yunis, 1967), vole (Microtus agrestis) (Lee & Yunis, 1971), rhesus

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