Does follicular dominance occur in ewes?

in Reproduction

Summary. The process by which a single follicle is selected to ovulate while others regress is unknown in ewes. If the dominant follicle secretes substances that directly inhibit the growth of other follicles, the superovulatory response to the administration of exogenous gonadotrophins may be blunted. Administration of 1250 iu pregnant mares' serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) before or after the emergence of the dominant follicle in the follicular phase, or 1000 iu PMSG in the presence or absence of a large healthy or atretic follicle during the luteal phase did not affect the induced ovulatory response. Comparisons between the ovary with or without the dominant follicle did not reveal any differences in ovulatory response to PMSG. The in-vitro features (i.e. mitotic index, oestradiol and testosterone production) of follicles ipsilateral or contralateral to the dominant follicle during the early and late follicular phases were also similar.

If the dominant follicle secretes substances detrimental to the other follicles, this could be mimicked in vitro. Co-culture of small follicles with the largest follicles in a closed system did not reduce their incorporation of 3H thymidine in granulosa cells, compared with small follicles cultured alone.

These data suggest that dominance is probably not operative in sheep. The administration of 500 iu of PMSG during the midfollicular phase increased ovulation rate in Merino ewes, indicating that dominance is essentially passive in ewes and can easily be overcome by raising gonadotrophin concentration.

Keywords: follicle; ovulation; gonadotrophin; paracrine regulation; sheep

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

 

     An official journal of

    Society for Reproduction and Fertility

 

Sept 2018 onwards Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 164 32 2
PDF Downloads 312 85 7